The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Through Films, Part 2

GENINT 721.546

Osher (50+). This course explores significant films – fiction and documentary alike – made by Israelis and Palestinians since 2000. These films focus on issues central to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and explore a variety of different perspectives.

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What you can learn.

  • Identify the central issues in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
  • Use films to expand perspectives and viewpoints
  • Explain the West Bank settlements and border wall

About this course:

In this course we explore significant films--fiction and documentary alike--made by Israelis and Palestinians since 2000. These films focus on issues central to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: the Second Intifada, the West Bank settlements, the border wall, Arab-Israeli relations within Israel, security concerns, and more. The objective is to become exposed to a variety of different perspectives, employ each film as a point of entry to understand the complexity of the problems in that part of the world, and nurture reconciliation through our own widening point of view on an exceedingly controversial topic. Films include: Promises, a deeply moving documentary about seven Israeli and Palestinian children; 5 Broken Cameras, a first-hand account of a peaceful resistance in a West Bank village: The Gatekeepers, the accounts of six former heads of Shin Bet, Israeli’s Secret Service; followed by Ajami and In Between, two films about the intermingling lives of Arabs and Jews in Israel.

Contact Us

Speak to an Osher representative. Hours: Mon-Fri, 8am-5pm.
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